orthopedic doctor

Memphis Orthopaedic Group’s Bartlett Office Open for Business – 3.12.18

MOG Bartlett Officer 3.12.18

Memphis Orthopaedic Group is pleased to announce a new office opening in Bartlett March 12, 2018.  The new office is located at 3045 Kate Bond Road, Bartlett, TN 38133.  Not only will patients be able to see one of MOG’s ten doctors, patients will also be able to have an MRI and physical therapy at the new Bartlett location.

All ten board certified physicians at Memphis Orthopaedic Group practice at their 3 locations, allowing patients to see their preferred physician, regardless of which office they visit.  Patients can now choose from the practice’s East, Germantown and Bartlett locations.

Patients can call the appointment line at (901) 381-4MOG or visit memphisorthogroup.com and specify their preferred location.

MOG’s North Office Relocates

 

MOG North

 

After over 40 years of treating patients here, Memphis Orthopaedic Group officially packs up and says goodbye to their office located at 3980 New Covington Pike, Memphis, TN 38128.  MOG’s North office is relocating to the Bartlett area and will see it’s first patients Monday morning.  The new office is located at 3045 Kate Bond Road, Bartlett, TN 38133.

Patients can call the appointment line at (901) 381-4MOG or visit memphisorthogroup.com and specify their preferred location.

Jean Simard, M.D. Joins Memphis Orthopaedic Group

Memphis Orthopaedic Group (MOG) is pleased to announce a new orthopedic surgeon, Jean Simard, M.D., joined the long-standing medical practice January 2, 2018.

Dr. Jean Simard graduated from Laval University School of Medicine in Quebec, Canada. He completed his orthopedic residency at Laval University. After his residency, he went to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota as a visiting physician. He did rotations in hip, knee, and shoulder reconstruction and then he did a trauma fellowship at the Campbell Clinic at the University of Tennessee.

After completing his fellowship, Dr. Simard was on staff at one of the Laval University teaching hospitals in Quebec City. Besides his busy orthopedic practice, he worked as a clinical instructor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. He was involved in teaching orthopedic residents as well as participating in many research projects. He has also given numerous presentations at different orthopedic conferences.

Dr. Simard practiced in Indiana for a few years prior to relocating to Memphis in 2002. He is board certified by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and is also Board Certified by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, of which he is a member. He practices general orthopedics with a special interest in hip and knee replacement, as well as shoulder and arthroscopic surgery. Dr. Simard stays current with the latest new technologies including MAKOplasty partial knee resurfacing. Dr. Simard enjoys doing outdoor activities with his wife Lyne and his two children.

“We are excited to bring such an experienced, talented surgeon to our team here at MOG, said Christopher Ferguson, M.D.

“We have been delivering quality outcomes to our patients for more than 75 years, and we are sure Dr. Simard will help expand our long-standing reputation, which is extremely important to all of us here in the MOG family.”

Memphis Orthopaedic Group has been providing cutting-edge orthopedic care to Memphis and surrounding areas since 1942.  MOG specializes in comprehensive orthopedic care.  The physicians at MOG diagnose and treat diseases and injuries of the bone, muscles, tendons, nerves, and ligaments in adults and children.

Appointments are now being made with Dr. Jean Simard. Call the office at 901-381-4664No referral necessary unless required by insurance.

Glenohumeral “Shoulder” Arthritis

Have you even woken up in the morning with stiffness in one of your joints? Do you find yourself noticing clicking, popping, or grinding when you move your joints? What about swelling especially after using the joint? You may be one of several million people in the United States who is affected by osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a process that may affect any joint in the body including the shoulder. Arthritis is known as general “wear and tear” of the cartilage in the joint and generally affects people older than 50. The purpose of the cartilage is to provide a smooth surface so that the bones move with ease. As this cartilage wears away, the ragged surface of the cartilage and then the surface of each bone begins to rub together causing inflammation to occur which leads to pain. Once the process begins there is no cure, but fortunately there are several treatments to help alleviate the associated symptoms.

Today we’ll discuss arthritis of the shoulder, or glenohumeral joint. As demonstrated in the picture below, the shoulder is made of three bones: the scapula, clavicle and the humerus. Shoulder arthritis occurs in the glenoid of the scapula and the head of the humerus.

Shoulder Blog 1

Symptoms include pain, a grinding sensation with movement, and stiffness. The severity may range from a mild nuisance to debilitating. When discussing your symptoms with your healthcare provider, they may obtain an x-ray of your shoulder. Some of the findings of an arthritic shoulder are demonstrated in the picture below. The x-ray on the left demonstrates a normal healthy shoulder and the one on the right demonstrates an arthritic shoulder. As we compare the two x-rays, we notice that the arthritic shoulder has a loss of the joint space and bone spurs (aka osteophytes).

Shoulder Blog 2

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It is always important to discuss your symptoms with your healthcare provider before beginning any treatment regime. Nonoperative treatments may include suggestions such as over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), such as Ibuprofen or Aleve, application of heat or ice, home exercises, and steroid injections. For those with advanced arthritis, your healthcare provider may refer you to an orthopedic surgeon for consideration of a total joint replacement.

The following is a link to more information about shoulder arthritis through the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: http://www.orthoinfo.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00222

-Christopher Pokabla, M.D.

-Lacy D. Johnson, P.A.

 

Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears

What are the treatment options for rotator cuff tears?  First and foremost, what is the rotator cuff?  It’s a group of four tendons all of which come from muscles that originate on the scapula or shoulder blade.  The tendons then attach to the “ball” of the shoulder joint forming about 1/2 of a shirt sleeve cuff from the front to the back of the “ball”.  The two middle tendons on the top of the ball are the one’s usually torn.  If you’re under forty years of age you probably don’t have a rotator cuff tear, i.e., the older you are the more likely the diagnosis. The under forty crowd most likely has rotator cuff tendinitis or, if injured, a shoulder separation, dislocation, or labral tear.   Middle-aged patients(forty to sixty years old roughly) tend to tear the rotator cuff after injuries whereas degenerative tears are more likely the older one gets. On the job rotator cuff tears are quite common.  

 Treatment options are conservative or nonsurgical, and surgical.  I treat most of my younger very active patients with surgery simply because they rarely respond to injections and physical therapy.  Surgery has a high success rate generally especially in healthy nonsmoking patients and many of these patients can resume normal activities and work several months after the repair. Rotator cuff surgery is easier and more likely to be successful if I can do the repair less than six months after symptoms begin.   Repeat surgery is required in less than 10% of patients. 

 Older patients have a much better chance of responding to injections, physical therapy, home exercises, activity modification, and “wait and see” treatment.  

 Hope this helps.  Thanks for your time.

Mark Harriman, M.D.